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Frequently Asked Questions

Please Note: On Sept. 29, SDSU announced that the majority of instruction would occur virtually, with limited exceptions. The university is also now requiring testing for all students taking in-person courses, in addition to all students living in on-campus housing. More information can be found here.

Please Note: On Sept. 29, SDSU announced that the majority of instruction would occur virtually, with limited exceptions. 
We understand that some may have a strong preference to be in an in-person class and we, ourselves, would prefer to be back on campus with students, faculty and staff. However, reducing the number of people on campus and restricting how people come together remains the safe and secure way to help prevent the spread of COVID-19. The plan for mostly virtual instruction follows that of other universities in the CSU system, in other parts of the state and in cities nationwide as we continue to address ongoing concerns with the global pandemic.
No, on-campus housing is not impacted by this decision and will remain open as planned.

Yes, you may return to your permanent residence at any time and leave your belongings in your assigned space.

However, keep in mind that billing for on-campus housing will continue if you do not cancel your license agreement and leave on-campus housing. 

Students who would like to cancel their housing contract and leave the on-campus housing are able to do so. To be clear, the university is not closing housing, but clarifying that students do have a choice to leave without financial penalty.  

The housing cancellation fee will be waived for all students who moved into their fall assignment and choose to cancel their license agreement. This fee will be refunded for students who moved into their fall assignments, have already moved out, and were charged the normal cancellation fee. Students will only pay the room and board fees for the days they are on campus.

If you would like to proceed with cancellation, please complete the Contract Release Request Form

Students who would like to cancel their housing contract and leave the on-campus housing are able to do so. To be clear, the university is not closing housing, but clarifying that students do have a choice to leave without financial penalty.  

The housing cancellation fee will be waived for all students who moved into their fall assignment and choose to cancel their license agreement. This fee will be refunded for students who moved into their fall assignments, have already moved out, and were charged the normal cancellation fee. Students will only pay the room and board fees for the days they are on campus.

If you would like to proceed with cancellation, please complete the Contract Release Request Form.

Yes.

On March 15, in an all-campus email, the university announced additional steps in the university's efforts to enhance social distancing and response. This included moving all instructional activities and office hours – including for any remaining lab courses –virtual platforms.

Fully virtual means that all course material is delivered through a web-based format, whereas a distributed class may include aspects of digital or web-supported formats, such as synchronous live lectures delivered from one’s office or distributed materials that are returned to the instructor via a variety of modalities. These options should provide maximum flexibility to each instructor within the confines of this very challenging public health care environment.

Additionally, SDSU announced on Sept. 2 that, given the rate of increase in the COVID-19 cases among the student population and out of an abundance of caution for the health and well-being of the campus community, a pause on in-person instruction is being implemented. This, and other changes, is effective on Sept. 3. On Sept. 29, SDSU announced that the majority of instruction would occur virtually, with limited exceptions. 

Additionally, on Sept. 10, California State University Chancellor Timothy P. White announced that CSU campuses would remain mostly virtual for the Spring 2021 semester.

No, not at this time. SDSU is closely following information relating to COVID-19. The university has opted to move courses into virtual spaces, and it remains open.

SDSU has increased both frequency and intensity of sanitizing and disinfecting across campus, and with special focus on currently populated areas. Further, community members will be provided with appropriate resources and educational materials to allow them to disinfect spaces before and after use.

Following U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) physical distancing guidelines, Parking and Transportation Services will not be utilizing the vans for the Red & Black Shuttle. Rather, carts will be utilized, along with the DoubleMap phone app. This will allow students to see, in real time, where the carts are located on each line. Community Service Officers (CSO) will continue to perform this operation with reduced hours on Monday through Friday, from 6 p.m. to midnight. Each cart will have no more than 2-3 passengers at time and all will be required to wear a facial covering (which will be provided by us should they not have one).  For more information please visit the Red & Black Shuttle website.

You may park only in the facility your permit is valid. Student permits are only valid in student lots, however after 6:30 p.m. students may park in faculty and staff areas. At no time may anyone park in a special permit (SP) area unless they have the SP assigned to them.

Our priority will be to offer the maximum amount of flexibility, so that we can be nimble as COVID-19 conditions change in the future, especially as we continue to observe the guidance from the CSU and physical distancing guidelines by county, state and federal orders. 

We are doing the following: 

  • We are moving most of our classes into virtual modalities, aligned with the California State University system’s decision to do so. We will offer certain lab, art studio, and performance-based courses in person, including clinical offerings that are required for licensure, while we continue offering lecture-based instruction via virtual modalities. 
  • We are expanding customized training for faculty members. The Flexible Course Design Summer Institute had nearly 300 faculty sign up in the first 24 hours when it was launched. As of May 21, about 600 faculty have signed up. 
  • We are also addressing accessibility and inclusivity, to ensure the quality education for all of our students.
  • We are expanding online activities and student support services significantly, to ensure SDSU activities, centers, and programs are still available to all our students. 
  • We are working tirelessly to identify and increase robust financial aid for our students.
SDSU Flex calls for high customization and will allow the maximum amount of flexibility to our community as COVID-19 conditions change in the future. With all lecture-based instruction intended to occur online in the fall, the SDSU Flex model will offer maximum opportunities for students to remain fully engaged with their faculty, staff members, peers and SDSU alumni — no matter their physical location. The model provides flexibility to our faculty, reducing the number of courses that may be needed to transition to fully virtual in the event of a second wave of the virus. SDSU Flex will also provide extensive time for faculty to prepare and modify their courses for the fall, in ways that differ drastically from the emergency move this spring.

Through the SDSU Flex model for Fall 2020, the university will: 

  • In consultation and agreement with the CSU, offer certain lab, art studio, and performance-based courses in person, including clinical offerings required for licensure, while offering lecture-based instruction via virtual modalities. 
  • Expand existing, customized pedagogy training for faculty members, which will also address accessibility and inclusivity, to ensure quality education. A training institute was launched for faculty. Faculty can learn more or sign up by visiting the Instructional Technology Services Training & Workshops site
  • Significantly expand online activities and student support service, and also maintain robust financial aid for our students.  
  • Carefully open the campus in phases based on guidelines beginning with faculty who need to return to their research or creative work in on-campus facilities.  
  • Continue to collaborate with county public health officials and to advocate the return of research and instructional faculty to campus as soon as permitted, and as we can safely increase support staffing to maintain campus safety. 

The majority of courses are offered via virtual modalities, as aligned with the California State University system. CSU Chancellor Timothy P. White announced on May 12 that all 23 campuses in the system, including San Diego State University, will move forward with planning for virtual instruction, with some exceptions, for Fall 2020. SDSU President Adela de la Torre announced shortly thereafter that after thorough and careful assessment and feedback from faculty and staff who have shared their expertise, and following this directive from the CSU, the university would offer virtual instruction in the fall through the campus-wide model, called SDSU Flex, the university-wide response to COVID-19 pandemic-related disruptions.

Please note that SDSU announced on Sept. 2 that, given the rate of increase in the COVID-19 cases among the student population and out of an abundance of caution for the health and well-being of the campus community, a pause on in-person instruction is being implemented. This, and other changes, is effective on Sept. 3. On Sept. 29, SDSU announced that the majority of instruction would occur virtually, with limited exceptions.

SDSU’s plans are in alignment with the California State University system-wide virtual approach. On May 12, CSU Chancellor Timothy P. White announced the system’s plan and said: “It would be irresponsible to wait until summer to plan for virtual learning across the curriculum. It is wise to plan now and over the next several months for enriched training and virtual learning environments and to be able to pull back again in the fall as in-person circumstances might be further allowed. It would be irresponsible to approach it the other way around.”

No.

SDSU is offering more unique undergraduate and graduate-level in-person courses in the Fall 2020. The in-person course list for Fall 2020 is now on the Office of the Registrar's site. Each class offered will have multiple sections, providing increased collaboration with faculty, while ensuring that physical distancing guidelines are followed.  

Because we do not have enough classrooms to offer all classes in person while providing for sufficient physical distancing, all other courses, which are predominately lecture and discussion based courses, will be offered virtually for the Fall. 

Similar to many universities across the U.S., we are committed to ensuring the health and safety of our students while providing an exceptional educational experience. Currently, a public health imperative requires less campus  density to limit the spread of COVID-19. Because we will need to keep physical distance for an undetermined time, we will certainly embrace the strengths of virtual instruction to ensure students can customize their learning experiences. At the same time we will maintain critical in-person elements for those courses which most need it.

We have prioritized offering in-person classes that meet certain parameters: 

  • Discipline-relevant standards and student-learning outcomes, which cannot be met by fully virtual delivery; 
  • Use of specialized equipment, which cannot be substituted in virtual delivery; and
  • Accreditation and/or licensure requirements that necessitate in-person experiences (to avoid impeding a future graduate's ability to gain access to advanced academic programs or field-based work placement).

Please not that SDSU announced on Sept. 2 that, given the rate of increase in the COVID-19 cases among the student population and out of an abundance of caution for the health and well-being of the campus community, a pause on in-person instruction is being implemented. This, and other changes, is effective on Sept. 3. On Sept. 29, SDSU announced that the majority of instruction would occur virtually, with limited exceptions.

Yes. The California State University system-wide virtual approach will allow for variability across the campuses, and CSU courses, especially lecture-type courses, will primarily be delivered virtually. However, only instruction and activities that cannot be delivered virtually will be conducted in-person, and with strict standards for safety and welfare.

SDSU is offering  unique undergraduate and graduate-level in-person courses in the Fall 2020. The in-person course list for Fall 2020 is now on the Office of the Registrar's site, and students are encouraged to check this list for course-specific information regarding in-person delivery. Each class offered has multiple sections, providing increased collaboration with faculty, while ensuring that physical distancing guidelines are followed.  

We have prioritized offering in-person classes that meet certain parameters: 

  • Discipline-relevant standards and student-learning outcomes, which cannot be met by fully virtual delivery; 
  • Use of specialized equipment, which cannot be substituted in virtual delivery; and
  • Accreditation and/or licensure requirements that necessitate in-person experiences (to avoid impeding a future graduate's ability to gain access to advanced academic programs or field-based work placement).

SDSU has been actively augmenting its investments in our instructional technology infrastructure and faculty training in order to deliver a dynamic and high quality learning experience that will allow our students to move towards their academic goals without interruptions. 

Virtual instruction is not new to SDSU. For years, we have been moving summer classes to virtual environments without sacrificing the quality of experience or instruction. We have found that when students and faculty members embrace the strengths of virtual instruction, both discover that there are ways to customize their learning environments, while maintaining critical in-person elements when most needed.

Also, SDSU’s Instructional Technology Services has been a recognized national leader for the last 10 years, offering extensive training and preparation for our faculty members so that they can teach using virtual modalities in accordance with Quality Online Learning and Teaching standards. Through new training institutes launched in the spring, faculty are learning new ways to expand their use of digital and virtual platforms to provide lectures, interact in virtual office hours, foster discussions, and conduct exams. 

Further, we are substantially increasing the number of sections for in-person courses, both to increase physical distancing and to improve faculty to student ratios. SDSU is committed to improving interactivity and quality for Fall instruction, regardless of whether the course is being conducted virtually, in a hybrid format, or in-person. We are confident that even during these challenging times our students will greatly benefit from engaging instruction and educational experiences—while also benefiting from meaningful interaction with award-winning faculty members, campus advising and tutoring support. 

This will depend on the role and nature of the work, and whether it is necessary to be on-site in Fall 2020.  Faculty and staff who are able to complete their work via telework arrangements will be encouraged to do so continuing through Fall 2020, with the exception of faculty approved to teach in-person courses or who are engaged in certain research and creative activities, as well as staff who are performing essential work that can only be performed onsite. 

Faculty and staff whose work can only be performed onsite and are unable to do so in the Fall due to medical conditions that make them more vulnerable to COVID-19, will receive reasonable accommodations in the form of telework assignments, where available, or will be provided with leave options consistent with California State University policies and applicable collective bargaining agreements.

No, on-campus housing is not required, but offered as an option for Fall 2020.

Incoming freshmen who cancel their license agreement by June 15, 2020 are eligible for a full refund of the $375 initial payment. Incoming freshmen who have had their license agreement rescinded will also receive a full refund to their student account automatically.

To provide maximum flexibility, we are suspending the freshman parking restriction for the 2020-21 academic year so that freshmen may bring their vehicles to campus. Yes, those who choose to do so will still be required to pay for parking if they are parking on campus.

Yes. 

Density in our residential communities has been reduced to include only double and single occupancy spaces located within apartment or suite-style living.

We continue to enhance our student support services, facilities and program offerings with you in mind. Our primary responsibility is to provide a safe and welcoming environment to all student residents. For those who are living on campus, you have access to inclusive living communities and the kinds of learning opportunities that support your holistic growth. Full-time staff including Residence Halls Coordinators, RAs/CAs, and Front Desk Assistants are available in the on-campus communities to support student success as well as safety. 

SDSU does not have the ability to impact off campus lease terms. However, a number of third-party housing companies have extended flexibility to allow students and residents to separate from their leases without financial penalty. Some off-campus landlords or leasing companies will also allow subletting or reletting of space, in addition to other options. We encourage our students to work with their off-campus property managers to explore what options, if any, they have to get out of their leases.

For those where this is not possible, SDSU is offering assistance in navigating needed financial or housing support through the Economic Crisis Response Team. Students can reach out to the team via the online ECRT assistance request form.

Meal plan packages have been updated for the 2020-21 academic year to provide increased flexibility of options. Students can choose a Mini Plan, Select Plan, or Prime Value Plan that includes an allotment of meals and weekly declining balances. More information about housing rates and meal plan options is available at housing.sdsu.edu/costs.

Meals plans for freshmen students living on campus are required. Meal plans for sophomore and upper division students living on campus are optional. Meal plans are not required for any students living off-campus. 

The Intent to Enroll is a non-refundable deposit. Your Intent to Enroll deposit will be applied toward your first payment of basic tuition and fees. The mostly virtual Fall semester will be a different experience but will be a rich and quality learning experience.  

Requests for refund of the non-refundable Intent to Enroll deposit will only be considered due to financial hardship, including those related to COVID-19.  The requests will be reviewed and assessed on a case-by-case basis.

To accommodate members of the San Diego State University community who have been impacted by the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, the fee payment deadline for Fall 2020 was extended to June 15, 2020 for all continuing students who were enrolled during the Spring 2020 term.  

For incoming new students (freshman/transfer) for the 2020-2021 academic year, San Diego State is a pre-pay campus which means you must pay your tuition prior to registering for classes. Students who participate in New Student Orientation will have the benefit of earlier registration on their orientation date.

If you are an incoming new student or parent and need more information, please visit Student Account Services New Student and Parent webpage. 

If you could not pay your tuition fees in full, here are some alternative ways for you to pay for the Fall 2020 semester: 

  • You can enroll in the Basic Tuition & Fees Installment Plan to better manage the cost of educational expenses. This payment option allows students and families to manage the cost of educational expenses by breaking up the total cost of an expense into multiple partial payments over the course of the semester.  You can enroll in the installment plan via the Online Student Account with an initial payment of $860. To learn more visit our Installment Plan webpage.
  • All students are encouraged to apply for financial aid by filing a 2020-2021 FAFSA to be considered for state and federal aid, such as grants, student loans, and parent loans. Scholarship opportunities are also available through the new Aztec Scholarship portal, as well as federal CARES dollars for qualifying students who had not filed a FAFSA for the 2019-20 year. The deadline to submit a scholarship application is August 15, 2020. To learn more about different types of aid visit the Office of Financial Aid & Scholarships website.
  • Lastly, you can pay your tuition fees using a third party payer or veteran’s benefit. To learn more visit the Student Account Services Payment Options webpage.

If you need additional financial assistance, please contact Student Account Services (via Live Chat on the site) or by email at [email protected].

Mandatory fees and tuition will not be discounted or reimbursed. Campus mandatory fees are not subject to refund except in very limited circumstances because they generally cover fixed and ongoing expenses and costs that the university continues to incur during the pandemic to finance, maintain and operate student facilities and programs (many of which remain available to students via remote access). Examples of these costs include but are not limited to ongoing administrative and overhead costs such as student government programs, academic retention and support, progress toward degree completion, employee wages and benefits, expenses for utilities, repair and maintenance, and payment of financing and long-term debt obligations for some facilities. 

Students pay campus mandatory fees regardless of whether they are a full-time student, part-time student, online student or a student studying abroad – and even if they do not expect to ever use the programs or facilities they support. We hope that students understand that if they want the facilities and programs to be available to them now and in the future, they must, of course, be financially supported and maintained during the pandemic.  

The California State University (CSU) Board of Trustees sets tuition costs. The CSU system said instruction on all 23 CSU campuses, including SDSU, is being conducted via hybrid, virtual and in-person (as exceptions) on a temporary basis to ensure that students continue their education and maintain their progress toward degree completion despite the current public health crisis. Tuition will therefore not be refunded.

While governed by CSU systemwide policy, because local campus student fees and the services and facilities they support vary across the system, local campuses can, however, make decisions about how to handle certain types of fees. SDSU has already chosen to issue prorated reimbursements for fees associated with covering services such as housing, meal plans and dining, or parking, for Spring 2020.

Finally, the university does have a process for students to request a refund for tuition and mandatory fees based on special circumstances. These special circumstances include tuition and fees that were assessed or collected in error; the course for which Tuition and Fees were assessed or collected was canceled by the university; the university makes a decision that the student was not eligible to enroll in the term for which tuition and fees were assessed or collected; or the student was activated for mandatory military service. If you believe you can demonstrate exceptional circumstances warranting a refund, you may petition in accordance with the campus policy

If you need to defer your admission for personal reasons, you can submit an application to appeal on the SDSU Office of Admissions site. Each appeal application will be evaluated on its merit on a case by case basis. International students who cannot be issued a VISA at this time due to travel or country-specific restrictions may also choose to defer enrollment through this process. 

Students who defer must maintain eligibility (e.g. first-time freshmen may not enroll at another institution after graduating from high school). Otherwise, they are considered transfer students and must satisfy upper-division transfer admission criteria.

In most cases, we discourage students from deferring their admissions. SDSU has been actively investing in preparing a dynamic and meaningful learning experience that will allow our students to move towards their academic goals without interruptions amid the COVID-19 pandemic. With the benefit of innovative solutions that will provide students a rich experience beyond the classroom we are confident that we will deliver a robust in-person and virtual education experience for our students.

First, we affirm and understand this is a difficult time--not only for SDSU students but for students all across the country. All admitted and continuing students are encouraged, but not required, to enroll and continue progress toward their degree, as the academic experience and the SDSU degree remain highly valuable, both in comparison to other Universities and to employers. In March, SDSU, along with the rest of the CSU, was required to quickly transition to offering courses and academic support to our students virtually. This pivot has provided us with insights and lessons that expand the adaptability of our instructional processes and our planning for Fall. With the benefit of constant monitoring, planning and consultation, as well as additional professional development and training for our faculty and staff, we are confident that we can deliver a robust virtual education experience for our students. We will also leverage innovative solutions to provide students a rich experience beyond the classroom, and will plan to add additional layers of in-person or hybrid experiences as conditions may permit, in the Fall. 

If you would like to move forward with a leave of absence, you can do so by contacting  the university registrar at https://registrar.sdsu.edu/students/academic_status/leave_of_absence

Continuing students may file for a leave of absence on the SDSU Webportal prior to schedule adjustment deadline.  For fall 2020, the schedule adjustment deadline was September 4, 2020. Additional information about eligibility for a leave of absence is available online on the Office of the Registrar website

Although the transition to virtual course delivery will decrease the number of student jobs needed on campus for Fall 2020, federal work study jobs still remain available, and our auxiliary organizations continue to have some job opportunities for students in research, food services, bookstore and other service areas. SDSU and its auxiliaries strive to bring back as many existing student employees as possible as the campus repopulates over the academic year and also hire additional students as needed based on new virtual or hybrid campus activities and needs. 

Aztec Shops, in particular, strives to bring back as many existing student employees as possible, and hire additional students as needed, based on campus activity, food service and bookstore customer demand. 

For Associated Students, there is also increased work in virtual programming and communications to maximize opportunities for students to engage and to meet their changing needs. Associated Students will also continue to assess and need student jobs to support: Aztec Recreation, including for virtual and live workout resources, ESports leagues, and more; the Aztec Student Union for different daily programming; Business Services and banking training sessions; Government Affairs; and much more to come. 

The Economic Crisis Response Team is also available to assist students in identifying campus employment, and students can reach out to the team via the online ECRT assistance request form.

With a summer to prepare for the SDSU Flex environment, SDSU continues to offer high quality and interactive activities for students, staff, and faculty. Partners across campus continue to plan virtual and hybrid delivery for co-curricular campus programs, including, but not limited to undergraduate research, entrepreneurship, community building, leadership programming, and service. Many SDSU centers, including but not limited to the Cultural Centers, Commuter Resource Center, Joan and Art Barron Veterans Center, Glazer Center for Leadership & Service, and Career Services continue to offer virtual office hours, student-centered, events, and opportunities to connect with staff and small group activities. 

Critical events that are central to our SDSU culture, like New Student and Family Convocation, Aztec Nights, One SDSU Community, continue to be offered virtually to welcome incoming students to our rich and vibrant campus community. 

SDSU is constructing an immersive student-focused virtual experience that creates social engagement and easy pathways for student involvement, access to student success services and integrated health and well-being resources. We are working diligently to ensure our new students will experience a successful transition to our supportive campus community. 

In addition, as county and state restrictions permit, the university will also explore phasing in additional in-person and hybrid student experiences throughout the fall semester.

SDSU is committed to offering robust co-curricular engagement opportunities for students during the fall. We plan to deliver activities, including but not limited to events, training, and mentoring, while supporting student leadership opportunities in Recognized Student Organizations, Fraternity & Sorority Life, Associated Students, and more. Students can access virtual event offerings by visiting: https://newscenter.sdsu.edu/student_affairs/virtual-events.aspx? .

The Aztec Recreation Center (ARC) is actively preparing physical distancing measures and other procedures to comply with the state's recently announced health and safety guidelines to reopen. 

The Mission Bay Aquatic Center (MBAC) is open for paddleboard and kayak rentals. Visit the MBAC website for more information and to purchase your rental in advance.

Yes, the university has ordered and is distributing COVID-related PPE and disinfection materials to units across campus. Each unit is responsible for maintaining such items. Each unit also is responsible for considering modifications to business processes to maintain six (6) feet of physical distancing.  Where business process modifications are impractical, for example in reception areas or computer labs, acrylic barriers have been installed.

In terms of PPE needs related to COVID 19, current public health guidelines indicate that  faculty and staff members will not need additional PPE beyond cloth facial coverings. Certain exceptions exist. Those who are required to work in closer proximity to others, such as those in public health, nursing and clinical psychology, or those whose specific work requires additional protection have been identified. SDSU will provide additional PPE to those employees. 

The university has not, however, purchased facial coverings for all students in the general student population. Students must provide their own. If students are unable to obtain their own facial covering, the university will help them to identify a covering, and options for obtaining them are widely available across campus including at the University Bookstore. Students who need assistance are able to submit a request to the Economic Crisis Response Team (ECRT). 

Due to limited supplies, N95 masks are not available to anyone other than first responders and those in training to become essential healthcare or public health personnel. Also, non-COVID related PPE required for normal operations will continue to be the responsibility of the college or unit.

Masks are required inside classrooms and other campus buildings where social distancing is not possible.

We understand that wearing a facial covering, which is an established public health guideline required for use in the county and state, may cause discomfort or aggravate underlying conditions for some individuals. If you have trouble wearing a facial covering or are unable to due to an underlying medical condition, you are asked to complete your work or study from home as you are able. If you must come to campus, you should wear a facial covering to the fullest extent possible and are encouraged to consult with your health provider about faial covering options that are safe for you to wear. Contact the Student Ability Success Center by emailing [email protected] to discuss options if you are a student. To discuss further, employees should consult with their supervisors or with SDSU’s Office of Employee Relations and Compliance by calling 619-594-6464 or emailing [email protected]

The ADA does not have any rules that address the required use of face masks by state and local governments.

All SDSU community members must wear facial covering while physically on campus or any campus property, with limited exception, such as when one is eating outside while physically distancing or if in a private office alone or private residence. The university requirement also applies to students, staff, and faculty with disabilities. Those who refuse to or cannot comply with COVID-19 related health/safety measures, such as wearing a facial covering in public spaces, may infect others if they are ill, and thus they can be considered as creating a danger or “direct threat” to the health and safety of those around them. They can also lead to SDSU being out of compliance with public health rules to which the university and its community must follow.

Students with disabilities may contact the Student Ability Success Center (SASC) to discuss options for navigating face covering policies. Since the health and safety of the entire campus community who are working, studying and living on campus in person will need to be considered when providing individual accommodations, not all requests for accommodation will be considered reasonable or appropriate to grant, especially if they endanger the health of others. However, solutions that balance the health/safety of the individual with the broader community will be sought. For example, the campus may provide see-through masks to individuals with whom a deaf/hard-of-hearing student needs to interact, or student services offices can provide options for virtual services to a student.

Students are encouraged to seek assistance from SASC as soon as possible if they believe they cannot comply with any of the COVID-19 related health/safety measures due to a medical condition or disability. SASC contact information during virtual operation can be found on SASC’s COVID-19 Information webpage.

Students who are enrolled in an in-person course, but are unable to wear a face covering should follow the same process for students who cannot attend in-person courses due to a COVID-19 related concern. Please complete the following form to request a letter from Student Ability Success Center (SASC) that the student can share with their instructor and their Assistant Dean to request academic arrangements: SDSU Flex - Request for SASC Letter Regarding In-Person Attendance

Once the form has been submitted the student will receive a letter from SASC within five (5) business days of the submission date. The letter will be emailed to the email address provided in the form submission. 

Once the student has received the letter, they should provide it to their instructor and assistant dean in their college as soon as possible in order for the appropriate arrangements to be made with your scheduled course. If you decide to drop or postpone taking the impacted course for a later semester, you are strongly encouraged to work with your academic advisor to understand if there will be any impacts on your academic progress. 

Academic arrangements that are made due to COVID-related concerns are temporary and only for the fall 2020 semester. Students who may require other academic accommodations during fall 2020 and beyond due to their own disability or medical condition should also register with SASC to establish approved accommodations for virtual and in-person courses. To start the registration process, please follow the steps on our website: https://newscenter.sdsu.edu/student_affairs/sds/getstarted-1.aspx

The SDSU Health Commitment asks students, faculty, staff, vendors and contractors to pledge to take responsibility for their own health and also demonstrate their commitment to their community by helping to keep the SDSU community safe from COVID-19 and other infections. 

The SDSU Health Commitment is voluntary. By signing you make a personal commitment to taking actions in support of individual wellbeing and community health.

The Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security (CARES) Act passed the House of Representatives, and was then signed into law by the president. The act provides federal government support in the wake of the coronavirus public health crisis and associated economic fallout. One section of the CARES Act established the Higher Education Emergency Relief fund and is providing the nation’s colleges and universities funding to then provide grants to students. This funding also covers a portion of unbudgeted costs and lost revenue due to the disruption of campus activities due to the COVID-19 pandemic.
The CSU Cares Program offers emergency grants for CSU students experiencing financial hardships directly due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The funding is made possible through the Higher Education Emergency Relief Fund (HEERF) authorized by the recent CARES Act, as well as existing CSU campus-based resources. Each CSU campus will distribute grants based on three shared CSU principles: Student Success, Equity, and also Timeliness and Administrative Simplicity.
SDSU applied for funding from the federal CARES Act. The university received that funding from the U.S. Department of Education. SDSU then began to quickly distribute grants to students based on their documented financial need. Recipients were notified via their campus email addresses, text and phone calls.
No, only those students who are eligible to file a FAFSA and have a verified FAFSA on file are eligible to receive federal funding through CARES. That includes undergraduate and graduate students. Eligible students are those currently enrolled undergraduate, graduate and professional students who are eligible to receive federal financial aid and were not enrolled in a completely online program as of March 13, 2020. All other currently enrolled students may receive emergency grants supported by other sources of institutional funding. Grants may be pro-rated for part-time students. Even if students have current financial holds or owe the campus fees or fines, they are still eligible to receive funding
SDSU and SDSU Imperial Valley graduate students who are eligible to file a FAFSA and have a verified FAFSA on file are eligible to receive federal funding through CARES. If you have not filed a FAFSA, you are encouraged to do so immediately to determine eligibility for the funds.
No, you do not qualify for CARES funding. The U.S. The Department of Education establishes eligibility requirements, one of which is that all students who receive CARES Act funding must be a U.S. citizen or have eligible noncitizen status. SDSU will, however, provide financial support relying on other, non-federal funding sources. SDSU and SDSU Imperial Valley students may also request assistance through the Economic Crisis Response Team by filling out the online form: https://cm.maxient.com/reportingform.php?SanDiegoStateUniv&layout_id=19.
No, you do not qualify for CARES funding. The U.S. The Department of Education establishes eligibility requirements, one of which is that all students who receive CARES Act funding must be a U.S. citizen or have eligible noncitizen status. SDSU is, however, offering funding to international students. SDSU and SDSU Imperial Valley students may also request assistance through the Economic Crisis Response Team by filling out the online form: https://cm.maxient.com/reportingform.php?SanDiegoStateUniv&layout_id=19.
No, you do not qualify for CARES funding. The U.S. The Department of Education establishes eligibility requirements, one of which is that all students who receive CARES Act funding must be making satisfactory progress towards their degree completion. SDSU and SDSU Imperial Valley students may also request assistance through the Economic Crisis Response Team by filling out the online form: https://cm.maxient.com/reportingform.php?SanDiegoStateUniv&layout_id=19.

Due to the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act, SDSU is not able to provide parents and families with information about student records, including a student’s eligibility status for CARES funding or funding disbursement amount. SDSU’s Office of Financial Aid & Scholarships has disbursed CARES Act funds to eligible students. Students who file the FASFSA will need to check their AidLink account for information regarding their eligibility.

SDSU and SDSU Imperial Valley students who require financial or other assistance may seek support through the Economic Crisis Response Team by filling out the online form: https://cm.maxient.com/reportingform.php?SanDiegoStateUniv&layout_id=19.

SDSU received $29 million as part of the federal Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security (CARES) Act in support of students. Of the $29 million awarded, at least 50% will be available for students to support food, housing, course materials, technology, health care, and child care needs. The funding is prorated based on the student's documented financial need and enrollment. Eligible undergraduate students will receive between $250 and $800. Grants will be based on Spring 2020 enrollment. Eligible students enrolled: full-time will receive $800; enrolled ¾ time will receive $600; half-time will get $400; and less than half time will receive $250. Eligible graduate students will receive up to $800.
Yes, in addition to providing federal funding to students with financial need as a result of COVID-19, the remaining funds will cover a portion of SDSU’s COVID-19-related expenses and lost revenue.
CARES Act funding must be used for specific purposes. It may only be used to help eligible students with food, housing, course materials, technology, health care, and child care. The funding will also cover a portion of SDSU’s COVID-19-related expenses and lost revenue.
Yes, students may only use CARES Act funding for food, housing, course materials, technology, health care, and child care.
No, students who receive CARES Act funding will not have to return the funds.
We recognize that the funding provided through the CARES Act may only cover a portion of financial need for some students. Other help is available to you, and you will not have to pay back the funding you receive through the CARES Act. SDSU and SDSU Imperial Valley students who require financial or other assistance may seek support through the Economic Crisis Response Team by filling out the online form: https://cm.maxient.com/reportingform.php?SanDiegoStateUniv&layout_id=19.
Yes, that is a possibility. All returning students are asked to submit a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) for the 2020-2021 school year online at www.fafsa.govhttps://studentaffairs.sdsu.edu/faodad/webal$al.main. SDSU and SDSU Imperial Valley who require additional assistance are asked to reach out to the Economic Crisis Response Team by filling out the online form: https://cm.maxient.com/reportingform.php?SanDiegoStateUniv&layout_id=19.
Given the shortened residential experience, and with the greatest concern for students and their families impacted by COVID-19 disruptions, SDSU opted to provide students with prorated refunds for housing and meal plans. In addition, SDSU students are able to request prorated reimbursements for semester parking passes. The university, through a fundraising initiative, has also raised tens of thousands of emergency funding for students experiencing crises.
No. The IRS reports that emergency financial aid grants under the CARES Act for unexpected expenses, unmet financial need, or expenses related to the disruption of campus operations on account of the COVID-19 pandemic, such as unexpected expenses for food, housing, course materials, technology, health care, or childcare, are qualified disaster relief payments under section 139 of the Internal Revenue Code.
No. The IRS reports that because the emergency financial aid grant is not includible in your gross income, you cannot claim any deduction or credit for expenses paid with the grant including the tuition and fees deduction, the American Opportunity Credit, or the Lifetime Learning Credit.

SDSU is involved in the following as a precaution during the growing public health threat associated with the COVID-19 outbreak.
The university:

  • Is providing updates to campus to students, faculty and staff via in person and email communications. Some communications occur more directly through guidance being provided to segments of the students, faculty and staff populations.
  • Is continuously monitoring and following recommendations of the San Diego County Health and Human Services Agency (HHSA), the California State University system, the California Department of Public Health (CDPH), the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the U.S. Department of State.
  • Established a group of campus health officials and specialists who are regularly communicating to assess needed action and communication related to this swiftly moving global public health situation.
  • Suspended university-related study abroad programs.
  • Decreased the number of students living on-campus.
  • Is providing screening for students who visit Student Health Services who have a fever, cough, sore throat, or other symptoms consistent with upper respiratory infections.
  • Is providing testing for students through Student Health Services.
  • Is providing testing for students, faculty, staff and community members through a partnership with the San Diego County Health and Human Sevices Agency.
  • Has shifted courses to the virtual space with limited exceptions for in-person instruction.
  • SDSU has instituted rigorous environmental cleaning before and after the event/meeting, as well encouraging the practice of preventive behaviors (e.g., providing hand sanitizer, tissue, etc.). Additional cleaning is occurring out of an abundance of caution. You may see individuals wearing protective gear during this time.

When the university receives notice of a confirmed COVID-19 test result, either from the individual tested or from a public health official, the university will follow its COVID-19 Case Communications Protocol to inform others and provide guidance and assistance to the individual and all close contacts.

SDSU has an established protocol for communicating when a public health authority confirms COVID-19 cases among members of the campus community.

Any student, faculty or staff member with a confirmed COVID-19 case is asked to share that information with SDSU through the COVID-19 Reporting Form.

There are many types of human coronaviruses including some that commonly cause mild upper-respiratory tract illnesses. COVID-19 is a new disease, caused by a novel (or new) coronavirus that has not previously been seen in humans. The novel coronavirus was first identified in Wuhan, China. The first infections were linked to a live animal market, but the virus is now spreading from person-to-person, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control.

The coronavirus can spread from person-to-person, through close contact, and primarily through coughing and sneezing. Washing hands, cleaning commonly touched surfaces, and avoiding sick people are the best ways to prevent the illness from spreading.

Additionally, beginning Friday, May 1, all County residents will also be required to cover their face while they are out in public and within six feet of someone that is not a household member.

COVID-19 is an emerging disease and is not yet entirely understood. Public health officials are still learning about the transmissibility, severity, and other features of the virus.

More information is available on the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website regarding coronavirus symptoms.

There is currently no vaccine for COVID-19. However, it is currently the flu and respiratory disease season, and the CDC recommends getting a flu vaccine. Also, everyone is encouraged to take everyday preventive actions to help stop the spread of germs, and taking flu antivirals if prescribed.

You may be at greater risk if you have recently traveled to regions where there are currently outbreaks of the virus, or if you have come into close contact with someone who has the virus. Symptoms typically appear within two to 14 days after exposure.

If you are not feeling well, stay home from work, school, and other errands, if possible. Remain home until you have been without a fever for at least 24 hours.

If someone is positive for COVID-19 they need to isolate:
  • For 10 days from the first time you experienced any symptoms
  • Or 10 days from the date of your test if you did not experience any symptoms 
At the end of this period, it is safe for a COVID-19 positive individual to return to their living situation as long as:
  • They have gone 24 hours hours with no fever without the use of fever reducing medication
  • AND other symptoms are of COVID-19 are improving 

* this does not include loss of taste of smell which may linger for weeks or months and need not delay the end of isolation

However, you should still practice preventative measures like wearing a facial covering and maintaining 6 ft of physical distance whenever possible. 

Be aware that it is SDSU Policy that you are participating in these behaviors outside of your home and avoiding any gatherings. 

An individual who has COVID-19 will no longer have a viral load large enough to continue infecting others after the 10 day isolation period. 

At the end of this period, it is safe to exit isolation. 

An individual who has COVID-19 will no longer have a viral load large enough to continue infecting others after the 10 day isolation period.

However, you should still practice preventative measures like wearing a facial covering and maintaining 6 ft of physical distance whenever possible. 

Be aware that it is SDSU Policy that you are participating in these behaviors outside of your home and avoiding any gatherings. 

If someone has come in contact with a COVID-19 positive individual they need to quarantine for 14 days after the last prolonged contact (15 minutes or more of close exposure). 

You should only leave your house for essential reasons -- like getting food, medication, or seeking medical attention, including COVID-19 testing. 

Wear a facial covering whenever outside of your home, maintain 6 ft physical distance, make any interaction as brief as possible, and practice excellent hand washing/sanitizer, are paramount to successfully avoiding getting others sick.

You can also order food or groceries to be delivered and order medication from CVS.   

At the end of this period, it is safe to exit quarantine. 

However, you should still practice preventative measures like wearing a facial covering and maintaining 6 ft of physical distance whenever possible. 

Be aware that it is SDSU Policy that you are participating in these behaviors outside of your home and avoiding any gatherings.

An individual who has COVID-19 will no longer have a viral load large enough to continue infecting others after the 10 day isolation period. 
While it may seem unfair and counterintuitive that an exposed individual is being asked to quarantine longer than a friend or roommate who tested positive, exposed individuals are asked to quarantine for a full fourteen days after their exposure in order to ensure that they do not acquire COVID-19. We know that COVID can onset at any point between two and fourteen days, so the best way to prevent the spread of COVID and protect others from exposure is to quarantine for the full incubation period.  

SDSU has decreased the density of campus and relevant spaces at any given time, to include staggering team member shift times to reduce the number of individuals arriving at one time, staggering breaks and lunches to decrease density in break rooms, and relying on appointment-based scheduling for services. For anyone on campus, facial coverings are required at all times, with limited exceptions. Further, SDSU has and will continue to facilitate physical distancing on campus in areas where students, faculty, and staff may gather or be in proximity to one another. Measures such as plexiglass barriers, signage, and decreased seating will serve to reduce physical contact as well as to remind community members of this critical infection control strategy. Overall, the number of employees and students on campus is significantly reduced and while the university is slowly repopulating, the number of people on campus at any given time will remain significantly reduced. 

SDSU has also increased both the frequency and intensity of sanitizing and disinfecting of surfaces across campus, especially in populated areas. The university also has developed isolation and quarantine scenarios for the upcoming year in consultation with San Diego County Health and Human Services Agency (HHSA). Additionally, community members have and will continue to be provided with appropriate resources, access to personal protective equipment (PPE) and educational materials to allow them to safely disinfect spaces before and after use.

Be attentive to the most recent information on the outbreak, available via the CDC's COVID-19 page and the World Health Organization's COVID-19 site.

Please note, beginning Tuesday, March 17, all non-essential personnel, and essential personnel whose work can be accomplished remotely, are asked not to come to the San Diego State University campus. Such employees are asked to telework.

Take care of your health and protect others by doing the following:

  • Regularly and thoroughly clean your hands with an alcohol-based hand sanitizer or wash them with soap and water. Washing your hands with soap and water or using alcohol-based hand sanitizer kills viruses that may be on your hands.
  • Avoid individuals who are ill, particularly if they are coughing or sneezing.
  • Cover your mouth and nose with your arm or tissue when you cough or sneeze. Properly dispose of any used tissues immediately.
  • Stay home if you feel unwell. If you have a fever, cough or difficulty breathing, seek medical attention.
  • Beginning Friday, May 1, all County residents will be required to cover their face while they are out in public and within six feet of someone that is not a household member.

Additional protection measures are suggested for those who are in or who have recently visited (defined as within the last 14 days) areas where COVID-19 is present. You are asked to:

  • Stay at home and self-isolate if you begin to feel unwell, even with mild symptoms such as headache and slight runny nose, until you recover.
  • If you develop fever, cough or difficulty breathing, seek medical advice promptly as this may be due to a respiratory infection or other serious condition. Call in advance and tell your provider of any recent travel or contact with travelers.

If you are ill, you are not to come to campus, and the university asks that all students and employees report any positive COVID-19 test results. Employees should immediately contact Employee Benefits by calling 619-594-6404 or emailing [email protected], and their supervisor. Auxiliary employees should contact their human resources department and their supervisor. Students should contact Student Health Services by calling at 619-594-4325. SDSU also encourages any individuals who are concerned about their health status to contact their health care provider or public health entity for further guidance. Any students and employees who test positive are asked to report their situation to the university.

Yes, the county public health order requires temperature checks for employees. On campus employees must complete a daily wellness check, consisting of a temperature read and a self survey of symptoms. In addition, SDSU is providing no-contact infrared thermometers to campus units to take temperatures of individuals coming into facilities, to include students, faculty, staff and visitors.

TAs and GAs who are scheduled to teach face to face classes but prefer not to teach due to safety concerns should contact their department chair. If this request cannot be accommodated based on operational needs, the TA/GA will be provided with the option to take an unpaid leave of absence from their TA/GA role for the Fall semester.

For those with a high risk medical condition identified by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), should you be asked to work in-person on campus, you may also request accommodations pursuant to the ADA, which may include telework or a leave of absence. University employees, including TAs and student employees, interested in requesting accommodations for this reason may do so by contacting the  Office of Employee Relations and Compliance at (619) 594-6464 to discuss reasonable accommodations.

If a TA becomes sick they should stay home. There are paid leaves available if someone were to get sick. If a TA does get sick it is important that they inform their supervisors that they are ill and stay home. The specific campus repopulation guidelines say that no employee should come to campus if they are not feeling well or if they exhibit symptoms of COVID-19. This is important for both individual and community health. 

For additional context, SDSU has planned for measures to protect employees’ health and safety. This includes protocols for low-density spaces with physical distancing, temperature and COVID-19 symptom checks, provision of PPE to employees, provision of disinfecting supplies and disinfecting protocols, filtration systems, and other measures. 

The university encourages all members of the campus community to remain home from school or work if they become sick. Inform your supervisor or faculty member of your absense.

Please note all non-essential personnel, and essential personnel whose work can be accomplished remotely, are asked not to come to the San Diego State University campus. Such employees are asked to telework.

According to the World Health Organization, “There is no specific treatment for disease caused by a novel coronavirus. However, many of the symptoms can be treated and therefore treatment based on the patient’s clinical condition. Moreover, supportive care for infected persons can be highly effective.”  Your personal medical provider can help assess your health condition if you are diagnosed with COVID-19 and recommend the best treatment plan for you based on your condition and your health history.  

If you experience any COVID-19 emergency signs or symptoms, seek emergency medical care immediately by calling 911 or going to an emergency department. These signs include: trouble breathing, persistent chest pain or pressure, confusion, inability to wake or stay awake, or bluish lips or face. These conditions require immediate treatment.

If you believe that a staff member has COVID-19 or has had very close contact with a person who has COVID-19 (such as living in the same household), please contact the Office of Employee Relations and Compliance at 619-594-6464 for guidance.

Please note all non-essential personnel, and essential personnel whose work can be accomplished remotely, are asked not to come to the San Diego State University campus. Such employees are asked to telework.

Please follow the direction from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) regarding prevention. The recommended steps include washing your hands often, avoiding close contact with people who are sick, staying home when you are ill, and also cleaning and disinfecting frequently touched objects and surfaces using a regular household cleaning spray or wipe.

Also, beginning Friday, May 1, all County residents will be required to cover their face while they are out in public and within six feet of someone that is not a household member.

SDSU also recommends continuing to read e-mails and updates from SDSU, and regularly checking this site. SDSU will continue to share important updates and information as this situation evolves and recommend any additional steps that students should take to stay well.

We know that some members of the SDSU community are feeling greater stress than usual, and I want to encourage you to seek out support and information from the many organizations on campus that are here for you.

Also, as with any natural or human-inflicted disaster, COVID-19 can lead to additional stress and worry to members of our community, including those who have personal connections to affected areas. This is a critically-important time for all of us to reinforce a community of care on our campus and support one another.

If you would like to talk with someone, support is available to students through campus mental health services:

Students can contact SDSU’s Counseling and Psychological Services, which is open Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 4:30 pm., by calling 619-594-5220. The After-Hours Crisis Line is 888-724-7240. For emergencies, call 911.

Faculty and staff can rely on the Employee Assistance Program which offers SDSU faculty and staff confidential support for a variety of concerns, including emotional, relationship, health, legal and workplace issues. Information, resources and tools are available by calling 1-800-342-8111 and visiting the EAP website.

Yes, testing is available for all currently enrolled students through Student Health Services and COVID-19 testing information for students is online. Testing is available by appointment only. Students can schedule appointments online through HealtheConnect, our secure online health portal. Students can also call Student Health Services at 619-594-4325 for more information. 

Additionally, SDSU is still hosting a County of San Diego-operated, walk-up coronavirus testing site. On Sept. 14, the site moved from SDSU Parking Lot 17B to the Parma Payne Goodall Alumni Center at 5250 55th St, across from Viejas Arena. Hours are Monday through Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Visit the San Diego County Health and Human Services Agency testing website for more information about the testing site locations offered.

Additionally, testing is required for all students living on-campus and all students enrolled in in-person courses. 

The testing center is open Monday - Friday, 8:30am - 4 pm.

 

San Diego State University is still hosting a County of San Diego-operated, walk-up coronavirus testing site. On Sept. 14, the site moved from SDSU Parking Lot 17B to the Parma Payne Goodall Alumni Center at 5250 55th St, across from Viejas Arena. 

No. Tests are free, and no copay is required.
Tests are conducted by San Diego County nurses and take 5-10 minutes.
Results from County-coordinated testing sites generally come back in approximately 3 to 5 days. If your test result is negative, you will be notified by e-mail. If your test result is positive, you will be notified by phone and e-mail. When checking e-mail, be sure to also check your junk mail folder. If you do not get an e-mail or call after 5 days, call 2-1-1 to speak to the COVID-19 Nurse Help Line.

No. The County testing site does not require a physician’s referral. Health plans are required to cover COVID-19 tests at no cost to the enrollee, even if you are asymptomatic. It is recommended that you first contact your health care provider for a COVID-19 test. If you are unable to get a test from your healthcare provider, the County has coordinated free diagnostic COVID-19 testing at many locations, including San Diego State University.

No. The County testing site is open to the general public.

SDSU agreed to host a County-operated testing site in consultation with the CSU Chancellor’s Office and public health officials in order to increase access to testing in the College Area and surrounding neighborhoods.

No. SDSU is only providing space for the testing center. All testing center operations are managed by the County of San Diego. A private third-party security company, hired by the County, will be present during the center’s hours of operation.

No. The County is responsible for cleaning all testing areas. County employees sanitize testing spaces frequently throughout the day and at the end of each day.

No. Private security has been provided by the County to assist with testing center operations.
Visit 211sandiego.org or call 2-1-1 to find a testing center near you.
If you have additional questions, please email [email protected]. For matters related to the testing center, visit the County of San Diego testing website.

 

Testing is available for all currently enrolled students through Student Health Services and COVID-19 testing information for students is online. Testing is available by appointment only. Students can schedule appointments by calling Student Health Services at 619-594-4325. Students can schedule appointments online through HealtheConnect, our secure online health portal. Students can also call Student Health Services at 619-594-4325 for more information. 

San Diego State University is still hosting a County of San Diego-operated, walk-up coronavirus testing site. On Sept. 14, the site moved from SDSU Parking Lot 17B to the Parma Payne Goodall Alumni Center at 5250 55th St, across from Viejas Arena. Visit the San Diego County Health and Human Services Agency testing website for more information about the testing site locations offered. 

However, children and families at the Children's Center should seek care from their medical provider or other health facility. 

You should seek testing when you are experiencing COVID-like symptoms. Testing is also recommended for those who have been exposed to an infected individual.  Students who wish to get tested but are asymptomatic and do not have an exposure, may also do so at Student Health Services.

No, not at this time. SDSU is closely following information relating to COVID-19. The university has opted to move courses into virtual spaces, and it remains open.

Yes. Beginning Tuesday, March 17, all non-essential personnel, and essential personnel whose work can be accomplished remotely, are asked not to come to the San Diego State University campus.

Employees were asked to make arrangements no later than Tuesday, March 17, and Wednesday, March 18 allowing employees to gather any essential work materials and equipment from their offices to successfully telework from home.

To support those who telework, SDSU’s Information Technology Services has introduced [email protected]: Remote Work Resources. This new site provides tools and resources for remote work, including request forms for equipment and other materials that may be provided without having to come to campus. Additional resources and direction to facilitate telework will be provided as soon as possible.

Further, you can contact the Office of Employee Relations and Compliance at 619-594-6464 to discuss reasonable accommodations.

No, upon careful consideration of the potential health and financial risks to students and their families, and due to the long-term uncertainty of the impact of COVID-19, SDSU has decided to suspend all study abroad programs administered by SDSU Global Affairs for spring break and summer and SDSU’s inbound and outbound study abroad exchange programs for fall 2020.

The university does not have the authority to suspend third-party partner programs in other countries.

Students should speak with their assistant deans who, at the department level, can identify the best alternate options. Also, to help mitigate academic disruption, SDSU will offer waivers to the international experience requirement to seniors graduating in May, August, or December 2020.

Students who are unsure if their study abroad program is administered by SDSU Global Affairs, should contact the SDSU Study Abroad office at 619-594-2475 or [email protected].

Please note: On Sept. 29, SDSU announced that the majority of instruction would occur virtually, with limited exceptions. Always check the website or social media (@SDSULibrary) for current hours before you plan to visit the library.

As of Sept. 3, the Library's 24/7 space is closed to the public. 

The "Domeside Pickup" service remains available for those looking to access materials from our collections and technology equipment.

All Library online services remain available, including access to digital collections, online research assistance, IT help, and remote access to licensed software.

Finally, members of the SDSU community can use the Love Library Patio to connect to the campus wireless network.

Please note: On Sept. 29, SDSU announced that the majority of instruction would occur virtually, with limited exceptions. Always check the website or social media (@SDSULibrary) for current hours before you plan to visit the library.

Circulating books, DVDs and government publications can be requested using Domeside Pickup. Find directions at https://library.sdsu.edu/domeside-pickup. Plan ahead -- after you request a book, it can take 48 hours (longer on weekends) before it is ready for pickup. You will receive an email when your materials are ready, then go to the Library Dome during pickup hours of Monday-Thursday 9-11 a.m. and noon-2 p.m. to retrieve your item.


Return materials in the return bins, located in front of each library entrance, in College of Arts and Letters, or the drive-up one in front of the Gateway Center at the corner of Hardy and Campanile Drive. Details at https://library.sdsu.edu/borrowing/returns 

Even when the library building is closed, there are still people to help! Depending on what you need, you can reach any of these groups by email, chat, or text:

General library questions and research help is available around the clock. Our online librarian chat is available around the clock to answer your library questions and provide research assistance. In addition to chat, they can also be reached by text or email. How-To Research Tutorials are also available online. Finally, our subject specialists can help with research and you can find your librarian here.

Online computer hub support is available Monday-Thursday 8 a.m.-7 p.m., Friday 8 a.m.-5 p.m., and Saturday and Sunday Noon-6 p.m. They can help with your questions about SDSU software as well as other computer issues. They can be reached by chat, text or email.

Visit our website at library.sdsu.edu, our dedicated COVID-19 page, and follow us on social media @SDSUlibrary and @SDSU.librarians.


The website has research guides, access to streaming media, information about our many collections and too many other things to list. Of course, the website is also the place to search our catalog for books, journal articles, government publications, streaming media, DVDs and so many more materials!

After thorough assessment, SDSU has decided to suspend all study abroad programs administered by SDSU Global Affairs for spring break and summer and SDSU’s inbound and outbound study abroad exchange programs for fall 2020, The university does not have the authority to suspend third-party partner programs in other countries.

Among the spring break and summer programs now suspended are: SDSU faculty-led programs, Transborder programs, Travel embedded in SDSU courses, SDSU’s Health and Human Services 350, and summer SDSU Exchange programs.

Any students with study abroad-related questions should contact the SDSU Study Abroad office at 619-594-2475 or [email protected]

The CDC offers travel guidance. You are asked to:
  • Stay at home and self-isolate if you begin to feel unwell, even with mild symptoms such as headache and slight runny nose, until you recover.
  • If you develop fever, cough or difficulty breathing, seek medical advice promptly as this may be due to a respiratory infection or other serious condition. Call in advance and tell your provider of any recent travel or contact with travelers.
  • Additionally, beginning Friday, May 1, all County residents will also be required to cover their face while they are out in public and within six feet of someone that is not a household member.

We urge you to be attentive to travel advisories and existing regulations, and to follow the guidance provided by agencies, such as the CDC and the U.S. Department of State.

Please familiarize yourself with the following:

If you are traveling in or returning from other countries, you may be asked by a public health official to restrict travel or to self-quarantine in certain circumstances. We urge you to follow the guidance of public health officials and government agencies.

In the rare instance travel could be deemed essential, please submit a written email justification via your supervisor to your Dean or Vice President for review and approval. Documentation (e.g. email) of Dean or Vice President approval must be submitted with your T-2 Travel Authorization Form.

Written justification is necessary to document that the traveler has obtained the required approval to travel on essential university-related business during the travel suspension.

Yes, travelers should make every effort to claim a refund. Many airlines, hotels and car rental companies are refunding or crediting individuals for these transactions. Travelers should collect and maintain documentation about the refund/credit request and outcome.

Refund requests that were denied by the travel partner are eligible for full reimbursement.

Refunds granted in the form of a voucher to the traveler are also eligible for full reimbursement, however will be treated as a travel advance to be applied to future university-related business travel. If the traveler uses the voucher for personal use, it will be reported as income subject to payroll tax withholding per IRS regulations.

Faculty/staff reimbursements through a travel claim or direct payment form for approved expenses may take 3-5 business days for reimbursement via direct deposit and 10 business days for a mailed check. Student reimbursements for airfare once  all required documents are submitted may take10 business days for a mailed check.

 Yes, travelers should make every effort to claim a refund. Many airlines, hotels and car rental companies are refunding or crediting individuals for these transactions. Travelers should collect and maintain documentation about the refund/credit request and outcome. Refund requests that were denied by the travel partner are eligible for full reimbursement.

Refunds granted in the form of a voucher to the traveler are also eligible for full reimbursement, however will be treated as a travel advance to be applied to future university-related business travel. If the traveler uses the voucher for personal use, it will be reported as income subject to payroll tax withholding per IRS regulations.

SDSU has suspended all study abroad programs for the spring and summer and inbound and outbound study abroad exchange programs for fall 2020. The university does not have the authority to suspend third-party partner programs in other countries.

Among the spring break and summer programs now suspended are: SDSU faculty-led programs, Transborder programs, Travel embedded in SDSU courses, SDSU’s Health and Human Services 350, and summer SDSU Exchange programs.

It is highly recommended that students consider alternate options for international study. If you are a student who is studying abroad or if you plan to study abroad later this year and have questions about programs, please contact the SDSU Study Abroad office at 619-594-2475 or [email protected]

When the university receives notice of a confirmed COVID-19 test result, either from the individual tested or from a public health official, the university will follow its COVID-19 Case Communications Protocol to inform others and provide guidance and assistance. Please refer to that full protocol for details of the many ways that SDSU will communicate about positive and confirmed cases among the SDSU Community. 

This protocol is directly informed by U.S. Department of Education (ED) guidance during the COVID-19 pandemic and guidance from the California State University system. The ED has affirmed that higher education institutions must continue to comply with the Clery Act throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, and has provided specific direction regarding compliance with the requirement that institutions notify the campus community upon confirmation of a significant emergency or dangerous situation that poses an immediate threat to the health or safety of the institution.

To satisfy the emergency notification requirement, the ED has instructed institutions to inform students and employees about COVID-19, necessary health and safety precautions, and encourage them to obtain information from health care providers, state health authorities, and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website. The ED indicated that notification may be accomplished using a single notification through regular means of communicating emergency notifications, such as email, text message, or web banner.

As a reminder, SDSU encourages any individuals who are concerned about their health status to contact their health care provider or public health entity for further guidance.

This site serves as the central repository for information and updates related to SDSU's preparedness, guidance and decisions related to COVID-19. Visit often, as the site is updated frequently.

Students can find helpful links, resources and information here.

Faculty and Staff can find helpful links, resources and information here.

Additionally, informaton about SDSU Flex's plan can be found here.

Yes, SDSU regularly sends email notices to students, faculty and staff about COVID-19. Please check your email regularly.

While SDSU is actively monitoring the global health situation with COVID-19 and has dedicated a team responsible for developing contingency plans, the university has not elevated to emergency status. The university reserves the use of SDSU Alert (the notification system capable of sending text alerts) for campus-wide emergencies. The university is asking all students, faculty and staff to review their university email accounts and this public-facing website, as these are two of the primary modes of communication in use. The university may begin utilizing other channels, including text messages, in the future.

Also, sign up for alerts: Students can register through the Web Portal; faculty, staff and members of the community can register for alerts online.

SDSU's International Student Center, available by calling 619-594-1982, is helping to connect international students to resources as needed.

Some may be concerned or become anxious about friends, relatives, colleagues or classmates who are living in or visiting affected areas. Fear and anxiety about the disease and becoming ill can lead to social stigma towards or discrimination of individuals from certain countries. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention describes that “Stigma is associated with a lack of knowledge about how COVID-19 spreads, a need to blame someone, fears about disease and death, and gossip that spreads rumors and myths. Stigma hurts everyone by creating more fear or anger towards ordinary people instead of the disease that is causing the problem.”

Please call a medical professional if, in the last 14 days, you:

  • Have traveled to an affected geographic area and have a fever and signs or symptoms of a lower respiratory illness (cough, shortness of breath), or
  • Have a fever with a severe acute lower respiratory illness that requires hospitalization and doesn't have an alternative explanatory diagnosis (e.g., influenza) and no known source of your exposure, or
  • Were in close contact with a confirmed case of COVID-19 and have a fever or signs or symptoms of a lower respiratory illness (cough, shortness of breath).

When you call, please inform them of your symptoms and recent travel or potential exposure before going to the health facility.

Contact your medical provider. Do not come to class or work until you are no longer sick and have received a negative COVID-19 test (if your provider recommended you be tested). Do not come to class or to work if you are waiting to receive the results of your test. Please report any positive COVID-19 test results to the university.

Student Success Fee (SSF) proposals that were awarded this year were approved for implementation in spring 2020. Per the SSF policy, unused funds will carry forward and be available for reallocation during the next proposal funding process in fall 2020.

In a March 4 vote, the University Senate's executive committee, acting on behalf of the Senate, voted and approved to implement a waiver on the international experience requirement, often referenced as the study abroad graduation requirement.

The waiver is designed to cover spring, summer, and fall suspensions related to COVID-19.

The waiver will apply when a student is in their final year of study, and the study abroad program has been suspended due to the global public health concern associated with the coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak.